Books

Antonia Terrizzano

A Tempo host Rachel Katz this Saturday (10/13 at 7 pm) speaks with Wall Street Journal opera critic Heidi Waleson about her new book Mad Scenes and Exit Arias: The Death of the New York City Opera. The book traces the history of the opera company, which declared bankruptcy in 2013 (and has since been revived in its latest incarnation under a new management structure), its artistic triumphs and fundamental challenges, and how these experiences are informing the direction of opera companies today.

Andy Aitchison

A Tempo this Saturday (9/22 at 7 pm) features a conversation with author Judith Chernaik, whose book, Schumman: The Faces and the Masks, was published this month. Host Rachel Katz will speak with Chernaik about the way Schumann expressed and wove these various personas through his music, critical writing and personal correspondence, as well as how his relationship with Clara - and his struggle with Clara's father - are reflected in his music. 

Actor, author and theater director Simon Callow discovered a whole new side to composer Richard Wagner when he was asked to create a stage show to celebrate the bicentennial of Richard Wagner's birth in 2013, and now Callow has turned his discoveries into a book, Being Wagner, which was just released in the U.S.  This Saturday (3/17), A Tempo host Rachel Katz chats with Callow about his thoughts on this musical giant, including how his darker side, including his seemingly obsessive focus on anti-Semitism, has colored the way his music has been, and should be, received.

The Vienna Philharmonic is wrapping up its 175th Anniversary Year. To mark this milestone, the Philharmonic has put out a new book (A Sound Tradition) surveying its history - from its artistic and cultural highpoints to its darker historic moments during World War II. This week on A Tempo (Saturday 12/30 at 7 pm), host Rachel Katz speaks with Christoph Wagner-Trenkwitz, author of the book and Chief Dramaturg of the Vienna State Opera, about the book and the Philharmonic's history. Joining in the conversation will be John Hargraves, who translated the book's English edition. 

Joanna Bergin

Robert Schumann wrote his Advice to Young Musicians in 1848 to share his thoughts and inspire the next generation of musicians. Now, cellist Steven Isserlis has revisited this collection of aphorisms and practical advice, presenting them in an updated form and adding his own thoughts in an effort to reach today's aspiring musicians. This Saturday on A Tempo (12/23 at 7 pm), host Rachel Katz interviews Isserlis about this endeavor, and some of his other children's books on musical themes. 

Andrea Avery had just begun to entertain the possibility that playing the piano would figure prominently in her career path when, at the age of 12, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.

With graduation behind them, many young musicians and performers have begun heading out on their career paths, and this week, A Tempo looks at two books addressing some of the issues these aspiring artists will face. Host Rachel Katz (7/1 at 7 pm) will interview Bernhard Kerres, CEO and founder of Hello Stage and author of Be Your Own Manager:  A Career Handbook for Classical Musicians, and dancer and financial professional David Maurice Sharp, author of The Thriving Artist: Saving and Investing for Performers, Artists and the Stage & Film Industries.

Westminster Choir College Professor James Jordan presents some of the recent research about the science of the human voice and how it can be applied to choral singing and teaching in the new book, The Anatomy of Tone, written together with some of his colleagues, and this week on A Tempo (Saturday 7 pm), host Rachel Katz will chat with him about some of these findings. Jordan will also discuss two of his other upcoming books - The Conductor as Prism, and Inside the Choral Rehearsal.