Upcoming and Noteworthy

"When I can't think of an overall theme, or I don't have a guest planned, I simply dig into my vast collection of piano recordings, pull out one or two at random, and hope that a nice playlist will eventually evolve," says The Classical Network's Artist-in-Residence Jed Distler, who produces, writes and hosts the ASCAP Deems Taylor Virgil Thomsom Award winning program Between the Keys each Tuesday night.

Friday Evening's (11-16) concert broadcast from the Princeton Symphony Orchestra features pianist Simone Dinnerstein in J.S. Bach's Keyboard Concerto No. 7 in G minor and the Piano Concerto No. 3 by Philip Glass.  Music Director Rossen Milanov conducts a program that also includes Mason Bates Auditorium and Le tombeau de Couperin by Ravel.

Photo by Matthew Murphy

Harvey Fierstein’s 35-year-old Tony-winning play "Torch Song Trilogy" is now slimmed down and called simply "Torch Song" in a new Broadway production with Michael Urie and Mercedes Ruhl. Theater critic Howard Shapiro reviews the production this week on In a Broadway Minute Friday (11/16) at 8 am and Saturday (11/17) at 10 am.

There’s more to Thanksgiving than turkey and football.  We’ll hear music from movies reflective of what’s best in human nature and most admirable in the American character, including selections from “The Cummington Story” (Aaron Copland), “Field of Dreams” (James Horner), “The Best Years of Our Lives” (Hugo Friedhofer), and “Lincoln” (John Williams); then count our blessings and aspire to do better, this Friday at 6 pm.

The mass Se la face ay pale of Guillaume Dufay is a mix of medieval strictness and Renaissance freedom, which is to be expected written as it was by the man who bridged both periods.  Hear a performance of this great mass on this week's Distant Mirror  as David Munrow directs the Early Music Consort of London. Later in the program music from the Chantilly Codex as the Ensemble P.A.N. performs selections by Baude Cordier, Jean Vaillant and Franciscus Andrieu.  Join Allan Kelly Friday night at 10.

Houston Grand Opera is turning to a music-loving armadillo named Sandy in its efforts to cultivate the next generation of opera lovers.

Host Gabriel Crouch, director of choral activities at Princeton University, explores Robert Shaw's recording of Beethoven's Missa Solemnis, including material and commentary from Shaw's notes and letters. Sounds Choral can be heard Sunday (11/18) at 2 pm.

An opera based on an 18th century Chinese work called the “pinnacle of Chinese fiction” by Bright Sheng and David Henry Hwang is this week’s Sunday Opera (11/18 3:00 p.m.).  “The Dream of the Red Chamber” is a huge work that features some forty main characters and over four-hundred secondary characters.  In this San Francisco Opera version, the focus has been fine-tuned by librettist David Henry Hwang.  

Teaching has its side effects, and one of those is the need for “calendar art”!  The Dress Circle program this week (11/18 7:00 p.m.) is an off-shoot of that need as we present a Thanksgiving program – of sorts.  In the past, we’ve looked at family, food, and “thanks” as themes, but this time, we wanted to share with you some of the theatergoing events for which we’ve been thankful over the years.  

If you were looking for them they were not hard to find - maybe it was the tell tale bulge of the portable cassette player from their jacket pockets or that curiously large briefcase they lugged as if it were the most ordinary of things to be taking into a performance in Zurich, New York, or Rome. Eyes shifting, they took their seats. They were the pirates, those denizens of the not so secret world of illegal opera recordings. They lived in the shadows and wanted nothing more than to go unnoticed.

For the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that formally ended World War I, it’s the second of a special two-part program showcasing “A World Requiem” by John Foulds.  Foulds’ work was given its premiere on Armistice Day, 1923, played four more times, then lay dormant for some 80 years until revived on Armistice Day, 2007, for this recording.  Also featured will be music by Cecil Coles, who died near the Somme in a heroic attempt to rescue his comrades.  War’s the pity, this Sunday at 10 pm.

Friday's Noontime Concert (11-16)  from Concerts on the Slope is titled Voices of Latin America.  We'll hear a piano quartet in Tania Leon's A Tres Voces and Fuego de angel by Roberto Sierra & a piano trio version of Beethoven's Symphony No. 2.

Thursday's (11-15) Noontime Concert from Freehold's Downtown Concert Series features tenor James Valenti with pianist Mark Hyczko.

Peter Schaaf, 2004

The next Princeton-based live broadcast of "What Makes it Great" with host Rob Kapilow will be held Friday, Nov. 30 at Miller Chapel on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary and will feature the four major choruses of Handel's Messiah. Kapilow will lead members of Princeton Pro Musica and The Monmouth Civic Chorus, prepared by Ryan Brandau.

Between the Keys' Bagatelle Buffet on November 13th

Nov 12, 2018

This week’s episode of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Virgil Thomson Award winning program Between the Keys is devoted to the art of the piano Bagatelle, with music by Beethoven, Ježek, Sibelius, Howard Ferguson, Dvorak, Poulenc, Edison Denisov, Saint-Saëns, Marie Jaëll, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Nikolai Kapustin and Edison Denisov. There’ll also be a Bagatelle by the Classical Network’s Artist-in-Residence Jed Distler, who is the creator, producer and host of Between the Keys.

Pages