Upcoming and Noteworthy

What's ahead on The Classical Network? Catch some of these great programs coming your way. Information on evening concert broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra and other nationally broadcast performances can be found on our home page.

  Luciano Pavarotti's legacy as one of the finest and most affecting singers of the twentieth century is on display this week on The Lyric Stage, as he sings arias, Italian art songs, Neapolitan songs, and the duet from Madame Butterfly with his childhood friend Mirella Freni, who said Pavarotti was "like a brother" to her. The recordings are mostly from the 1970's and 1980's when he was at his vocal peak.

We never like to do this type of a program, but we felt compelled to remember another wonderful performer whom we lost far too early on this week’s Dress Circle (10/14 7:00 p.m.) as we look back at the career of Marin Mazzie who passed away after a three-year battle with ovarian cancer on September 13 at the age of 57.  For us, we’ll always remember her iconic performance as Mother in “Ragtime” where she stopped the show with her incredibly moving performance of “Back to Before.”   We were also thrilled to see her spirited performance as Lilli Vanessi / Katharine in the 1999 revival of “Kiss Me Kate.”  These two shows alone are testament to her versatility and power.  

It's the music of Orlando Gibbons and William Lawes on Friday's Distant Mirror as Fretwork performs consort music for viols from the early Stuart period in England.  Fretwork is joined by lutenist Christopher Wilson and organist Paul Nicholson.  Also on the program, more chansons from the French medieval masterpiece The Romance of the Rose.  Selections by Machaut, Binchois and Dufay.  Alla Francesca performs.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

Perhaps in an attempt to subvert our fears, or to generate laughter from tension, filmmakers have frequently juxtaposed humor with the supernatural – or at any rate death.  Get into the Halloween spirit with music from four macabre comedies, including “Arsenic and Old Lace” (Max Steiner), “The Trouble with Harry” (Bernard Herrmann), “The Ghost and Mr. Chicken” (Vic Mizzy), and “Beetlejuice” (Danny Elfman).  It will be a mishmash of horror and humor, this Friday at 6 pm.

Joan Marcus


Friday's Noontime Concert (10-12) from Tempesta di Mare, Philadelphia Baroque Orchestra Chamber Players is titled Holiday in Paris - Telemann's musical vacation.  We'll hear 18th Century music by Guignon, Forqueray, Blavet and Telemann.

Antonia Terrizzano

A Tempo host Rachel Katz this Saturday (10/13 at 7 pm) speaks with Wall Street Journal opera critic Heidi Waleson about her new book Mad Scenes and Exit Arias: The Death of the New York City Opera. The book traces the history of the opera company, which declared bankruptcy in 2013 (and has since been revived in its latest incarnation under a new management structure), its artistic triumphs and fundamental challenges, and how these experiences are informing the direction of opera companies today.

A trickster and a vengeful husband are featured on this week’s Sunday Opera (10/14 3:00 p.m.) in Giacomo Puccini’s “Gianni Schicchi” from his collection “Il Trittico” and Ruggero Leoncavallo’s “Paglicacci” from Los Angeles Opera On Air.  The afternoon begins with Placido Domingo as the scheming Schicchi who tricks the bickering Donato family out of part of their inheritance by pretending to be their dead relative, Buoso, and writing the will Buoso left unfinished.  Joining Domingo are Andriana Chuchman as Schicchi’s daughter Lauretta, who sings the much loved aria “O mio babbino caro,” her beloved Rinuccio is Arturo Chacon-Cruz, and Meredith Arwady as the imperious Zita.  

This Wednesday at noon (10-10)  we'll hear guitarist Hao Yang in the Sonata by Antonio José and Giulo Regondi's Introduction et caprice.  Then Bolai Cao performs Beethoven's Sonata No. 32 in c minor.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon, repeated Monday evening at 10.

Thursday's (10-11) Noontime Concert from West Winsdsor-based Sinfonietta Nova includes Philadelphia Orchestra concertmaster David Kim in Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto.  Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5 rounds out the program.

In the 1820's, there was a fashion for stage works featuring sonnambulism or sleepwalking. This led to a popular 1827 ballet The Sleepwalker, or the arrival of a new Lord, and it is that work that in 1830 inspired Bellini and his librettist Felice Romani to write La Sonnambula. The opera premiered in Milan in 1831.

The music is timeless, and you hardly need to know what the plot is to appreciate the opera, but it does have a plot, albeit one that has not worn well nearly 200 years after the opera's premiere.

Celebrate October on this week’s Dress Circle (10/7 7:00 P.M.) as we showcase our regular  survey of shows that opened on Broadway this month.  The program will feature music from Rodgers’ and Hammerstein’s forgotten gem “Allegro” as part of a varied menu that includes music from Sting’s musical memory “The Last Ship.”  

Corn and tomatoes from the New World!  Spaghetti and fireworks from the Orient!  Snow cones and frostbite from the Antarctic!  Defy sea serpents and the flat earth with music from “Christopher Columbus” (Sir Arthur Bliss), “The Adventures of Marco Polo” (Hugo Friedhofer), “Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West” (Sam Cardon), and “Scott of the Antarctic” (Ralph Vaughan Williams).  There’s still much to discover, this Friday at 6 pm.

On Friday's Distant Miror selections from The Romance of the Rose, one of the masterpieces of French literature that influenced much of medieval culture including Dante and Chaucer.  Much of the text was set to music and you can hear several selections, including pieces by Adam de la Halle and Guillaume Machaut.  The Ensemble Alla Francesca perofrms.  The program concludes with viol music from Elizabethan England: Works by Dowland, Byrd an Holborne.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

Joan Marcus


Friday's Noon Concert on 10-8 features music by Clérambault, Pinchard, Whitman, Blavet, Cope & Telemann.

Violinist Nikki Chooi & pianist Sejoon Park perform music by Beethoven, Chausson, Tower & Franck in Thursday's (10-4)  Noontime Concert  from Merkin Concert Hall at the Kaufman Music Center in NYC.

A promising violinist in her teens, Jessica Stuart put aside her instrument in college as she struggled with a cascade of mental illness challenges. She never expected to play it again, let alone perform, until about 15 years later, when a doctor suggested she look into the Me2/Orchestra in Burlington, Vt., which was launched in 2011 to create a safe, warm and welcoming environment for musicians facing various forms of mental illness (and not to be confused with the more recent #MeToo movement protesting sexual assault and harrassment).

A recurring theme in opera deals with forbidden love that leads to a tragic ending, and this week’s Sunday Opera (10/7 3:00 P.M.) is a version of that in Vincenzo Bellini’s “Norma” from LA Opera On Air.  Angela Meade stars as the titular Druid princess who falls in love and secretly has children with the Roman proconsul Pollione (Russell Thomas) against the laws set forth by her father, Oroveso (Morris Robinson).  

Sunday (10/7) evening at 11 we'll hear Three Hymn Tunes by Johan Kvandal, the String Quartet No. 14 by Dmitri Shostakovich and Howard Hanson's For the First Time for solo piano.  Music from the past half-century on Half Past.

Sunday, 9-30 at 11 PM on Half Past we'll hear music by Kenins Talivaldis, Nigel Clarke, Norman Dello Joio & Thomas Christian David.  Music from the past half-century.

This week on The Lyric Stage, selections from Ferdinando Paer's 1805 opera, Sofonisba, about an early third century Princess of Carthage trapped in a life or death situation between her country and the Roman empire. Jennifer Larmore heads the cast.

Paer was a noted composer in his day, and a special favorite of Napoleon, just as he had been a special favorite of Marie Antoinette before the French Revolution. He composed in many genres, and his works contain elements of both classical and romantic styles, making him a transitional figure in Opera's history.

The Lost Chord: September 30 - Romania Mania

Sep 30, 2018

Travel to Southeast Europe for neglected music from Romania, including George Stephanescu’s “National Overture” and Paul Constantinescu’s Piano Concerto.  György Ligeti emerged from Transylvania to become one of the great composers of the second half of the 20th century, yet his wholly accessible and delightful “Concert Romanesc” remains little known.  There’s more to Romanian music than George Enescu, this Sunday at 10 pm.

We lost Neil Simon on August 26th and we wanted to celebrate the life of this brillian playwright who brought joy to theatre audiences around the world for over five decades on this week’s Dress Circle (9/30  7:00).  Simon is probably best known for his plays and comedies like The Brighton Beach Trilogy and “The Odd Couple,” but he’s also a perfect subject for The Dress Circle since he penned several books for musicals.  

The Old Hall Manuscript is the largest, most  complete and most significant source of English sacred music of the late 14th, early 15th centuries.  On Friday's Distant Mirror you can hear selected motets from the manuscript: works by Lionel Power, Thomas Dammett, John Cooke and others, all performed by legendary countertenor Russell Oberlin.  Also on the program  are chansons by  Claude Le Jeune and madrigals from Monteverdi's second book.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

The game is afoot!  Tune in for an hour of music from movies inspired by the world’s greatest detective, including “Sherlock Holmes” (Hans Zimmer), “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes” (Miklós Rózsa), “Young Sherlock Holmes” (Bruce Broughton), and “Without a Clue” (Henry Mancini).  Enjoyment is elementary, my dear Watson, this Friday at 6 pm.

Friday's Noontime Concert (9/28) from Concerts on the Slope in Brooklyn features Duo Helix: Isabel Lepanto Gleicher, flutes & Eric Umble, clarinets with guest pianist Paul Kerekes.  We'll hear music by Kerekes, Belinda Reynolds, Barry Sharp, Aaron Helgeson & Derek Bermel.

Friday evening, 9-28, at 8 we present the first in a series of concerts from The Orchestra Now (TON), an orchestra of young musicians hand-picked from the world's leading conservatories.  Founder Leon Bottstein leads TON in Carl Maria von Weber's Clarinet Concerto No. 1 & the 7th Symphony by Gustav Mahler.

Thursday's (9/27) Noontime Concert from Freehold's Downtown Concert Series features Mark Hyczko and the New Brunswick Chamber Orchestra in High Windows by Christopher Cerrone, Serenade by Howard Hanson, Icarian Rhapsody by Mason Bates, Son of Pandu by Shruthi Rajasekar and Bela Bartok's Divertimento.

Daniel Gonzalez

Even after her marriage to Robert Schumann, Clara (Wieck) Schumann continued composing and performing. While her income from performing was crucial to her family's financial stability, she also continued because of the important role music played in her life.

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