Upcoming and Noteworthy

Join us Friday, 12-7 at noon for a holiday program from the NJ MasterChorale which includes John Rutter's Gloria, Christmas carols and William Gorton's Festive Te Deum.

Blair Miller was tired of feeling like she was always the youngest person in the audience when she attends orchestral concerts - something she's done ever since she was three years old and went to Philadelphia Orchestra concerts with her mother. Now, Miller is CEO and lead advocate at ConductAction, which is developing strategies to attract younger audiences to classical music performances by drawing connections between social action and important causes to the music and composers featured on concert programs.

The heroic folk-legend of Swiss patriot William Tell is this week’s Sunday Opera (12/2 3:00 p.m.) from Opera Southwest.  Gioacchino Rossini’s opera, with a libretto by Etienne de Jouy and Hippolyte-Louis-Florent Bis which was based on the play by Friedrich Schiller, features the love story of Arnold and Mathilde told against the Swiss fight for freedom, led by Tell, from the Austrians who have been in power for one-hundred years. 

This Thursday (12-6) on the Noontime Concert from Astral Artists in Philadelphia pianist Henry Kramer plays music by Schumann: Kreisleriana, Ravel and Hannah Lash: Six Etudes & A Dream.

Photo by Matt Dine

Thursday evening, 12-6 at 8:00 we present The Orchestra Now under the direction of Leon Botstein in Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain, Frank Martin's Six Monologues from Jedermann and the 3rd Symphony by Tchaikovsky.

Wednesday, 12-5 at noon we'll hear Curtis Institute students in Bela Bartok's String Quartet No. 5 and Mozart's Piano Sonata in F, K 332.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute Wednesdays at noon and Monday evenings at 10.

Sunday evening, 12-2 at 11 we'll hear the Trumpet Concerto No. 2 by Anthony Plog, Steve Mackey's Physical Property for guitar and string quartet and Dos Danzas Latinas by Nancy Galbraith.  Music from the past half-century on Half Past. 

Celebrate Hanukkah, the eight-day Festival of Lights, with music on Jewish themes and by Jewish composers, including “Aspects of a Great Miracle” by Michael Isaacson, “Three Hassidic Dances” by Leon Stein,” and “The Klezmer Concerto” by Ofer Ben-Amots.  Enjoy your fill of light and latkes, this Sunday at 10 pm.

The Lyric Stage: Dec 2 - Puccini's Mimi.

Dec 2, 2018

Now that you know who I am, says Rodolfo to this beautiful stranger he has just met, please tell me who you are. She answers that they call her Mimi, although her real name is Lucia. Her story is brief - she lives all alone in a little white room looking out on roofs and into the heavens, and doesn't always go to church. She makes magic on canvass by embroidering flowers that speak of love and springtimes. And when spring comes, the first sun is hers, the first kiss of April is hers.

Listen to the Pope Marcellus Mass on Friday's Distant Mirror, the work which is credited with saving polyphonic church music.  The story goes that in order to more easily combat the reformation the church had to present a music that was less elaborate and therefore more audible to the ordinary layman.  At the Council of Trent in 1555 the cardinals were about to agree to return to plainchant when Pope Marcellus comissioned Palestrina to compose a mass that would show the world that part-music could be both concise and musically valuable.  The Pope Marcellus Mass is consider

Do the holidays already have you feeling a little disoriented?  This week, on “Picture Perfect,” we’re literally seeing double.  Tune in for music from “Vertigo” (Bernard Herrmann), “La double vie de Véronique” (Zbigniew Preisner), “Dead Ringer” (André Previn), and “The Prince and the Pauper” (Erich Wolfgang Korngold).  Double your pleasure with movies about mirror images, this Friday at 6 pm.

Friday, 11-30 at noon we present Cantus Novus in concert with a program titled "A Perfect Light."  The progam includes traditional carols, John Rutter's Gloria  and songs  by Eric Whitacre, Guy Forbes and others.

When On Site Opera explored the idea of staging Amahl and the Night Visitors, General and Artistic Director Eric Einhorn set about finding a way to bring it to an appropriate venue to tell the holiday story of charity and giving. His solution was to bring it to the Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen in New York - and to partner with Breaking Ground, which provides housing and other support to the homeless, to create a chorus comprised of those who have experienced homelessness in their lives.

Ancient Babylon is the setting for this week’s Sunday Opera from OperaDelaware (12/2 3:00 p.m.) with Gioachiono Rossini’s last Italian opera, “Semiramide” featuring a libretto by Gaetano Rossi based on Voltaire's tragedy “Semiramis,” which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.  Nicknamed by some as “’Tancredi’ revisited,” the story deals with the power-struggle of Queen Semiramide who was one of the people responsible for the death of her predecessor.  

Thursday's (11-29) Noontime Concert from Merkin Concert Hall in NYC features pianist Daniel Lebhardt in the Italian Concerto  and the Prelude & Fugue, BWV 867 by J.S. Bach, and selections from Rachmaninoff's Sonata No. 2.

Tuesday's Noontime Concert (11-27)  from Concerts on the Slope is titled Voices of Latin America.  We'll hear a piano quartet in Tania Leon's A Tres Voces and Fuego de angel by Roberto Sierra & a piano trio version of Beethoven's Symphony No. 2.

(Note: This broadcast was rescheduled from Nov. 16).

Inspired by Brueghel’s painting “The Land of Cockaigne,” Knudage Rissager’s ballet, “Slaraffenland,” imagines a Promised Land “where roasted pigeons fly around in the air with knives and forks in their backs, and the streets are paved with marzipan and chocolate.”  A silly boy wanders into the country of King Sauce and becomes ill from overindulgence.  Along the way, he encounters Robin Hood, the Three Musketeers, Captain Fear, Fountains of Liqueur, Cigarettes, and the Candy Princess.  Conclude the long, gluttonous holiday weekend with a dose of musical tryptophan, this Sunday at 10 pm.

  Baritone William Warfield (1920-2002) combined a wonderful voice and the gift of song with a great range of style. This week he sings a variety of songs and arias showing that range, including an aria from Handel's Messiah, songs by Robert Schumann,  Jerome Kern's Ol' Man River, and the complete set of Copland's Old American Songs.

The composing team of Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones enjoyed a collaboration that lasted over 60 years but are still probably best known for only one of their shows, "The Fantasticks."  We thought we'd remedy that on this week’s Dress Circle and take a look at some of their work which may not be that familiar from shows such as the Julius Monk revue “Demi-Dozen.”  

The Folger Consort visits Distant Mirror Friday night with a program of Renaissance instrumental music from their CD Playing with Fire: Fiery Improvisations of the popular Tunes and Dance Music of the 16th century.  While most are anonymous pieces there are selections here by Jacques Moderne, Francesco de la Torre and the collector Pierre Phalese.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm. 

At the very dawn of color television, the National Geographic Society began its successful run of eagerly anticipated specials.  These specials really were special, with breathtaking images and real-life adventures unlike anything previously experienced in American living rooms.  Episodes were scored by some of top film composers of the day, including Elmer Bernstein (“Yankee Sails Across Europe”), Ernest Gold (“The Last Vikings”), Leonard Rosenman (“Dr. Leakey and the Dawn of Man”), and Jerome Moross (“Grizzly!”).  Travel the world with National Geographic, this Friday at 6 pm. 

Photo by Matthew Murphy


Jessy Harmer (Fidelio Arts Ltd)

Princeton University Concerts (PUC) celebrates its 125th anniversary this year, and a major focus of the season will be Maestro Gustavo Dudamel, who was named as PUC's first Artist-in-Residence. His residency will be marked with performances and panel discussions on a variety of topics, including "The Artist in Society" and "The Arts and Faith." The programs kick off Dec. 1, and A Tempo this Saturday (11/24 at 7 pm) previews some of the events.

Just in time for the holidays, we’ll be spending an afternoon with Edgar Allan Poe on this week’s Sunday  Opera (11/25 3:00 p.m.).  We’ll begin with two versions of Poe’s novella “The Fall of the House of Usher” from the San Francisco Opera.  This supernatural tale deals with the final days of the Usher family after the premature burial of Madeline.  The first version is Gordon Getty’s “Usher House” which will be followed by Claude Debussy’s fragments of “La Chute de la Maison Usher” which were completed by Robert Orledge.  

For the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that formally ended World War I, it’s the second of a special two-part program showcasing “A World Requiem” by John Foulds.  Foulds’ work was given its premiere on Armistice Day, 1923, played four more times, then lay dormant for some 80 years until revived on Armistice Day, 2007, for this recording.  Also featured will be music by Cecil Coles, who died near the Somme in a heroic attempt to rescue his comrades.  War’s the pity, this Sunday at 10 pm.

If you were looking for them they were not hard to find - maybe it was the tell tale bulge of the portable cassette player from their jacket pockets or that curiously large briefcase they lugged as if it were the most ordinary of things to be taking into a performance in Zurich, New York, or Rome. Eyes shifting, they took their seats. They were the pirates, those denizens of the not so secret world of illegal opera recordings. They lived in the shadows and wanted nothing more than to go unnoticed.

Teaching has its side effects, and one of those is the need for “calendar art”!  The Dress Circle program this week (11/18 7:00 p.m.) is an off-shoot of that need as we present a Thanksgiving program – of sorts.  In the past, we’ve looked at family, food, and “thanks” as themes, but this time, we wanted to share with you some of the theatergoing events for which we’ve been thankful over the years.  

The mass Se la face ay pale of Guillaume Dufay is a mix of medieval strictness and Renaissance freedom, which is to be expected written as it was by the man who bridged both periods.  Hear a performance of this great mass on this week's Distant Mirror  as David Munrow directs the Early Music Consort of London. Later in the program music from the Chantilly Codex as the Ensemble P.A.N. performs selections by Baude Cordier, Jean Vaillant and Franciscus Andrieu.  Join Allan Kelly Friday night at 10.

There’s more to Thanksgiving than turkey and football.  We’ll hear music from movies reflective of what’s best in human nature and most admirable in the American character, including selections from “The Cummington Story” (Aaron Copland), “Field of Dreams” (James Horner), “The Best Years of Our Lives” (Hugo Friedhofer), and “Lincoln” (John Williams); then count our blessings and aspire to do better, this Friday at 6 pm.

Friday Evening's (11-16) concert broadcast from the Princeton Symphony Orchestra features pianist Simone Dinnerstein in J.S. Bach's Keyboard Concerto No. 7 in G minor and the Piano Concerto No. 3 by Philip Glass.  Music Director Rossen Milanov conducts a program that also includes Mason Bates Auditorium and Le tombeau de Couperin by Ravel.

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