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For the month of July, a month that begins with a celebration of America, we asked our distinghuished roster of Sounds Choral Hosts to submit a lits of favorite American choral works. Those lists will provide the playlists for these July episodes. Hosted by David Osenberg.
Program 2- music of Sametz, Corigliano, Wolfe, Lang, LaVoy & Reich

With Bastille Day right around the corner, surge to power on the allegedly diminutive shoulders of Napoleon Bonaparte.  We indulge in small pleasures with a little music from “War and Peace” (Nino Rota), “The Pride and the Passion” (George Antheil), “The Duellists” (Howard Blake), and “Napoleon” (Arthur Honegger).  It will be a satisfying show by any measure, this Friday at 6 pm.

Roland de Lassus, perhaps more popularly known as Orlando di Lasso, was the chief representative of the polyphonic sound of the sixteenth century Franco-Flemish school. He wrote over 150 chansons that were enormously popular throughout Europe, and on Friday's (7/12) Distant Mirror you can hear several of these performed by the Ensemble Clement Jannequin. There's also music by Torelli, Morley and Couperin. Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

The Lyric Stage: July 14 at 8PM - Lisa della Casa

Jul 11, 2019

On this week's Lyric Stage we have Lisa della Casa singing Mozart and Strauss, including the first complete recording of Strauss' Four Last Songs, which she made in 1953. She will also sing arias by Handel and Puccini, and some Lehar as well. 

The Lost Chord: July 14 - French Connections

Jul 11, 2019

For Bastille Day, enjoy original works by figures who employed their skills as orchestrators in the service of more celebrated French composers, including Henri Rabaud (orchestrator of Fauré’s “Dolly Suite”), André Caplet (orchestrator of Debussy’s “Children’s Corner,” “Clair de lune,” “Le Martyre de saint Sébastien,” and “La Boite à joujoux”), Henri Büsser (orchestrator of Debussy’s “Petite Suite” and “Printemps”) and Charles Koechlin (orchestrator of Fauré’s “Pelléas et Mélisande” and Debussy’s “Khamma”).  These musical Cyranos emerge from the shadow of Roxane’s balcony, Sunday at 10 pm.

Between the Keys on July 9: “Liszt Makers”

Jul 9, 2019

Franz Liszt’s music dominates this week’s edition of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Virgil Thomson Award winning program Between the Keys, hosted by the Classical Network’s Artist-in-Residence Jed Distler.

“We haven’t had an all-Liszt program for some time,” says Distler,” so I decided to pour through my collection and put together a play list of terrific performances by some of the best ‘Liszt Makers’ on record.”

For the month of July, a month that begins with a celebration of America, we asked our distinghuished roster of Sounds Choral Hosts to submit a lits of favorite American choral works. Those lists will provide the playlists for these July episodes. Hosted by David Osenberg.
Program 1- music of Bernstein, Copland, Ives, Lauridsen & Paulus.

Kids on Keys: Saturday July 6th at 1 PM

Jul 6, 2019

On Saturday July 6th at 1:00 PM, The Classical Network’s Artist-in-Residence Jed Distler hosts the monthly program Kids on Keys, a showcase for young keyboard talents who are based in the station’s principal south and central New Jersey broadcasting areas.

This month’s edition of Kids on Keys features pianists Michael Zhou, Alex Chen, Preston Steimel, Gracelynne Hao and Tom Borrow.

Kids on Keys is proudly sponsored by Jacobs Music Company.

Panel Discussion from Dolce Suono Ensemble's Rediscoveries: Festival of American Chamber Music II from March 31, 2019. Moderator: Mimi Stillman, founder, Artistic Director & Flutist Dolce Suono Ensemble, Panelists: Richard Wernick, composer, James Freeman, conductor, Miranda Cuckson, violin; Charles Abramovic, piano

'Celebrating Our Musical Community' broadcasts of Dolce Suono Ensemble's Rediscoveries: Festival of American Chamber Music

The star-spangled glare of American music doesn’t just end with the fireworks.  This week, on “Picture Perfect,” we’ll bask in the pyrotechnic after-glow of Independence Day with an hour of film music by Aaron Copland.  Enjoy selections from “The City,” “The North Star,” “Something Wild,” and the Academy Award winning score for “The Heiress.”  It’s music for the silver screen by the Dean of American Composers, this Friday at 6 pm.

Mauchaut Ballades on Friday's Distant Mirror

Jul 4, 2019

All the horrors of the 14th century are caaptured by the greatest poet/composer of the time, Guillaume Machaut in his compilation, The Judgment of the King of Navarre, and on Friday's (7/5) Distant Mirror you cn hear several  ballades from this major work performed by the Ensemble Gilles Binchois durected by Dominique Vallard.  Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

Grand Finales on Between the Keys, July 2nd

Jul 2, 2019

What makes a grand finale grand?

A grand finale can be combative and defiant, like the fugue from Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata, especially when Claudio Arrau delves into the music, leaving no stone unturned. A grand finale can be a vast, rugged landscape, as in Charles Ives’ First Sonata, navigated by its premier explorer, William Masselos. In the capable hands of Leonard Pennario, the finale of Robert Schumann’s Piano Sonata No. 1 runs wild yet never loses control.

Wednesday's (6-26) Curtis Calls has been pre-empted for fiscal year end fund raising.  Tune in Monday, 7-1 at 10 PM to hear two works by Beethoven: Sonata No. 18 in E-flat major, op. 31 no. 3 and String Quartet in F major, op. 18 no. 1. Performance from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music.

Between the Keys on July 2: Grand Finales

Jul 1, 2019

What makes a grand finale grand?

A grand finale can be combative and defiant, like the fugue from Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata, especially when Claudio Arrau delves into the music, leaving no stone unturned. A grand finale can be a vast, rugged landscape, as in Charles Ives’ First Sonata, navigated by its premier explorer, William Masselos. In the capable hands of Leonard Pennario, the finale of Robert Schumann’s Piano Sonata No. 1 runs wild yet never loses control.

Sunday evening, 6/30 at 11 on Half Past we'll hear To the New World by Alla Borzova, Richard Danielpour's The Awakened Heart and the Piccolo Concerto by Avner Dorman.  Music from the past half-century on Half Past.

From 1892 to 1954, more than 12 million immigrants passed through Ellis Island in search of a better life.  More than 40 percent of the U.S. population, over 100 million Americans, can trace their roots to someone who entered this country along that route.  Composer Peter Boyer assembled texts from testimonials archived as part of the Ellis Island Oral History Project to create “Ellis Island:  The Dream of America.”  These are real words of real people telling their own stories.  The New Colossus lifts her lamp, this Sunday at 10 pm.

This week June 30 on the Lyric Stage, excerpts from Luisa Miller, one of the last operas of Giuseppe Verdi's early period. It was a time of development for Verdi that led to his breakthrough with the threesome of Rigoletto, La Traviata and Trovatore shortly after the premiere of Luisa Miller.

It's the music of  14th century Flemish composer Alexander Agricola on this Friday's (6/28) Distant Mirror. Agricola's music is rarely performed today bcause of its difficulty and eccentricity, but Paul van Nevel has long ben a champion of the lost cause and has arranged several of Agricola's mass movements into a musical quilt that he calls the Missa Guazzabuglio, which trnslates freely a "mishmash".  Van Nevelk directs the Huelgas Ensemble. Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

This week's Friday night broadcast (6/28 at 8 pm) features PostClassical Ensemble, the resident ensemble of the National Cathedral, in an evening of music by Bernard Herrmann. Featured works include music from his score for the movie "Psycho," his  Clarinet Quintet "Souvenirs de Voyage," and the radio play "Whitman" with music by Herrmann, in honor of the bicentennial of Whitman's birth.

Every time you support The Classical Network, you make a kindly extraterrestrial’s heart glow.  Every time you don’t contribute – you risk activating the destructive power of Gort!  It’s the final day of our end-of-the-fiscal-year membership campaign.   Please do your part to ensure universal harmony by calling 1-888-232-1212, or by donating online at wwfm.org.  Then enjoy music from “Cocoon” (James Horner), “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (Bernard Herrmann), “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” (John Williams).  We come in peace, this Friday at 6 pm.

The new, the old and the unexpected take center stage this week on the ASCAP Deems Taylor Virgil Thomson Award winning program Between the Keys.

Sunday evening (6-23) at 11 on Half Past we present the Viola Concerto by Miklos Rozsa, Suite, op. 41 for guitar by Jacques Hetu and Etude op. 40, no. 5 for piano by Mikolai Kapustin.  Music composed in the past half-century.

Celebrate Midsummer with music for St. John’s Eve.  The Feast Day of St. John the Baptist (June 24) is like Christmas, in that it coincides with solstice time.  But St. John’s Eve is more like Halloween.  It’s a time for the lighting of bonfires against evil spirits – when witches are believed to rendezvous with powerful forces, such as the demon Chernobog, who emerges from the Bald Mountain – as the sun again pursues a southerly course.  Indulge in some Midsummer madness, with music by Modest Mussorgsky, Alfred Schnittke, and Gunnar de Frumerie, this Sunday at 10 pm.

The Lyric Stage: June 23 - Frederica von Stade

Jun 23, 2019

  Frederica von Stade's long career and broad repertoire includes the work of many French composers, and this week on the LS we feature her in arias and duets  from a 1979 recording of Jules Massenet's Cendrillon.  

Composer Steven Sametz, Artistic Director of The Princeton Singers, presents his A Child's Requiem as host of Sounds Choral this Sunday (6/23) at 2 pm.

For those of us of an age, Sunday nights meant one thing: Ed Sullivan, and we’re going to be looking at some musical memories from the Ed Sullivan show on this week’s Dress Circle (6/23 7:00 p.m.).  We’ll do this through a series of CDs on the TVT label that preserved some of the wonderful performances, many of which couldn’t be seen elsewhere.  We’ll sample four of these sets.  Two dedicated to Broadway, one to Rodgers and Hammerstein, and a final set featuring opera performances by stars like Roberta Peters.  

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