young artists

Carnegie Hall has been exploring the impact of immigration and migration on the development of American music this Spring, including concerts highlighting the influence of the Scots Irish, Jewish immigrants, and the migration of African Americans from the South to Northern cities after the Civil War. The series culminates May 19 with a concert performance, "Soul Mechanism," comprised of works written by participants in its Weill Music Institute's songwriting programs, and A Tempo this Saturday (5/11 at 7 pm) features conversations with some of the participants about their music.

Conducting superstar Gustavo Dudamel wound up his residency with Princeton University Concerts last week, participating in discussions about art and society, conducting the Princeton University Orchestra and Glee Club in two concerts, and stopping in to answer questions by young musicians attending a Seminario that brought together youth music programs from New Jersey and the region inspired by the El Sistema movement.

A Tempo this Saturday (3/23 at 7 pm) wraps up its two-week feature on the New World Symphony and its 31 years of training musicians for musical careers. This week host Rachel Katz focuses on the symphony's mission to provide career development, including expanded explorations of community outreach, alternative programming and entrepreneurial initiatives.

Getting young people interested and involved in music, particularly classical music, has long been a goal of orchestras, and this Saturday (1/19 at 7 pm) A Tempo looks at two upcoming concerts designed along that mission. Host Rachel Katz will speak with Hunterdon Symphony Conductor Lawrence Kursar, whose own composition, Gingerbread Boy, designed to introduce young listeners to the brass section, will be premiered by the orchestra Saturday Feb. 2. The program will also preview the Capital Philharmonic's Youth Orchestra Festival on Saturday Jan.

Nick Donnoli/Princeton University Concerts

Gustavo Dudamel, music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was back in Princeton this past week for his second round of panels, performances and activities as Artist in Residence with Princeton University Concerts, this time meeting with two groups of young local musicians to provide some feedback and inspiration.

Photo courtesy of John Hoffmeyer

As a student at Princeton University, John Hoffmeyer has been combining his love of literature with music, finding links between them and creating performance opportunities that have opened doors to classical music for new listeners. The founder of the Princeton Chamber Music Society, Hoffmeyer was recently named a 2019 Rhodes Scholar, and he is now looking forward to delving more deeply into these connections and providing more experiences that expand access for more people and communities to classical music.

The Classical Network salutes the great work being done by the many non-profit organizations in our community that work to lend a hand to others. We are glad to once again offer some of these organizations the opportunity to share some thoughts on their mission on our airwaves on Giving Tuesday, November 27.

Maryland Lyric Opera this month kicks off its 2018-2019 season, which will include its first fully-staged production since its founding in 2014. The season includes a concert performance of La Fanciulla del West in September and a staged production of Lucia di Lammermoor in January, as well as expanded opportunities to young singers through its Young Artist Institute. A Tempo this Saturday (9/8 at 7 pm) features a conversation with Music Director Louis Salemno about these programs and Maryland Lyric Opera's mission. 

Todd Rosenberg Photography

Carnegie Hall's National Youth Orchestra program launched its first-ever jazz program this summer, and this Saturday (8/4 at 7 pm) A Tempo takes a look at this new opportunity for young musicians. Host Rachel Katz will chat with pianist Brooke Wyatt from Houston, TX, and Wyatt Forham, a bass trombonist from St. Louis, MO. She will also speak with Joanna Massey, Director of Learning and Engagment Programs at Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute.

WWFM had several visitors on May 18 as part of the Mercer County Teen Arts Festival, sponsored by the Mercer County Cultural and Heritage Commission and held at Mercer County Community College. Production Manager and A Tempo host Rachel Katz led a workshop showing students what goes into creating a show and being on the air. As always, it was great to meet these students who appreciate music and the arts!

David Swanson

A Tempo wraps up its commencement series this Saturday (5/19 at 7 pm) with a conversation with Joseph W. Polisi, who is stepping down this year after 34 years as President of The Juilliard School. The Curtis Institute of Music presented him with a Lifetime Achievement Award "in recognition of his extraordinary influence on the lives and development of actors, dancers, and musicians as performers, creators, and artist-citizens," and he was invited to deliver the Commencement address.

With graduation season underway, A Tempo this week begins a short series of conversations with accomplished musicians who are giving back to young artists or imparting their wisdom at Commencement ceremonies. This Saturday (4/5 at 7 pm) host Rachel Katz chats with Philadelphia Orchestra Concertmaster David Kim, who frequently performs with youth and community orchestras and will be the soloist in the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto with West Windsor, NJ-based Sinfonietta Nova on Sunday May 6.

This Wednesday (1-31) at noon on Curtis Calls we'll hear Curtis students perform Mendelssohn's 2nd Piano Trio and Sergei Prokofiev's Flute Sonata.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evenings at 10.

Celebrating Our Musical Future this Monday (11/13) presents a performance of Monteverdi's 1610 Vespers by Westminster Choir College's Westminster Kantorei under the direction of Dr. Amanda Quist. The Italian master who straddled the Renaissance and Baroque periods was always progressive and innovative, combining the worlds of early opera with the music of the church, and this monumental Vespers is a testament to his genius and stunning compositional skill. Join host David Osenberg for this broadcast at 8 pm.

This Week (11-8 at noon & 11-13 at 10 PM) on Curtis Calls, from the graduation recital of violinist Timmy Chooi:  Beethoven's "Spring" Sonata and Edvard Grieg's Sonata No. 3 in c minor.  Then Timmy's brother Nikki, a 2012 Curtis graduate, joins him for Pablo de Sarasate's "Navarra."  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evenings at 10.

Having recently graduated from San Francisco Conservatory of Music, clarinetist Lotte Leussink and french horn player Craig Hansen are not just looking to perform with orchestras and other ensembles in their future - they hope to help change them for the better.

Enjoy an extended evening of performances from the Curtis Institute of Music this Monday (10/23) on Celebrating Our Musical Future at 8 pm.  The program includes Beethoven's Septet in E-flat Major, Op. 20, a sonata from Georg Philip Telemann's Tafel-Musik, and Luciano Berio's 11-song cycle "Folk Songs."

This Monday's Celebrating Our Musical Future presents the Princeton University Orchestra in works by Hindemith and Mahler.

Celebrating Our Musical Future this Monday (10/9) features the Rutgers Symphony Orchestra in a program that includes El Amor Brujo by Manuel de Falla, the Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor by Frederic Chopin and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6 in B Minor 'Pathetique.'

On  Curtis Calls, pianist Bolai Cao plays Prokofiev's Sonata No. 8 and the Brahms Trio in a minor, op. 114 is performed by Tianyi Shen, clarinet, Sang-Eun Lee, cell0 and Tianxu An, piano.  Music from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon, repeated Monday evening at 10.

Celebrating Our Musical Future takes you to the Manhattan School of Music for concerts by the Manhattan School of Music Chamber Sinfonia and Chamber Orchestra Monday at 8 pm.

This Wednesday (9-27) at noon, from the graduation recital of violinist Shannon Lee, we hear Bach's Sonata in E, BWV 1016, Beethoven's Sonata in A, op. 30, no. 1 and the 1st Rhapsody by Bela Bartok.  Music from student recitals at the Curtis Institute, Wednesdays at noon, repeated Monday evening at 10.

This Monday Celebrating Our Musical Future presents a performance by the West Chester University Wind Ensemble and also the West Chester University Concert Choir. Tune in at 8 pm.

This Wednesday at noon (9/20) we'll hear pianist Chelsea Wang in Beethoven's Sonata in E-flat major, op. 31 no. 3 and also the String Quartet in F op. 18 no. 1.  Music from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon, repeated Monday at 10 PM.

Celebrating Our Musical Future returns from summer break with chamber music performances by students at The Curtis Institute of Music.  The broadcast program will feature Mozart's Quintet for Piano and Winds in E-flat major K 452 and Franz Schubert's Octet in F Major D 803.  David Osenberg hosts this program Monday at 8 pm.

PRINCETON – The legacy of The American Boychoir School may continue to reverberate through the Central New Jersey region, as the Princeton Girlchoir readies plans to launch a boychoir division of its own.

The American Boychoir School, whose choir has performed with major orchestras and pop stars including Beyoncé, is closing its doors after 80 years as declining enrollment hampered its financial recovery.

In a statement posted Tuesday on its website, Rob D’Avanzo, chairman of the school’s Board of Trustees, said enrollment for the coming year fell unexpectedly, leaving the school with 19 to 21 students to start the semester in three weeks.

Join us for Six Bagatelles for Wind Quintet by Ligeti, a guitar sonata by Antonio Jose, a Haydn piano sonata and music for solo cello by Miklos Rozsa.  Music from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon and the following Monday evening at 10.

A Tempo host Rachel Katz this week interviews Daniel Hsu, the bronze medal winner at the 2017 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Hsu is a student at the Curtis Institute for Music, which is also the Alma Mater of this year's gold medalist, Yekwon Sunwoo. Hsu will talk about his experience in preparing for and performing during the competition, which is held every four years in Forth Worth, Texas. That's Saturday at 7 pm.

It's a rare opportunity when an emerging composer gets extended rehearsal time with a symphony orchestra to work through a new piece. So the chance to spend a week preparing a new work with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and hearing feedback directly from musicians offered an unusual learning experience for a select group of composers earlier this month. 

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