Upcoming and Noteworthy

What's ahead on The Classical Network? Catch some of these great programs coming your way. Information on evening concert broadcasts of the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra and other nationally broadcast performances can be found on our home page.

Wednesday at noon (4-24) on Curtis Calls, from the graduation recital of harpist Heloise Carlean-Jones, we'll hear Sonata for Harp by Hindemith, a Fugue by J.S. Bach, an Impromptu by Faure, the Trio for violin, cello and harp by Ibert and Ravel's Introduction et allegro.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evening at 10.

Between the Keys April 23: The 200th Episode

Apr 22, 2019

The ASCAP Deems Taylor Virgil Thomson Award winning program Between the Keys airs its 200th program this week.

Sunday evening, 4-21 at 11 on Half Past we'll hear Salt in the Blood for chorus by Judith Bingham, Tashi by Lukas Foss, Libby Larsen's Adrift! A Little Boat Adrift and the Clarinet Concerto - Fire Dances by Deborah Drattell.  Music from the past half-century on Half Past.

The devout Belgian composer Joseph Ryelandt composed his Symphony No. 4 on the very eve of World War I.  This inspirational work concludes with a triumphant statement of the Credo from the Catholic Mass.  Also featured will be a Credo setting by the Franco-Flemish composer, of some four centuries earlier, Josquin des Prez.  Enjoy two spiritual discoveries rooted in the Mass, Easter Sunday at 10 pm.

This week we have Moussorgsky's masterpiece, Boris Godounov, based on the play by Pushkin. Boris Godunov served the court of Ivan IV (menacingly referred to by history as "The Terrible"), and in 1584 Ivan named Boris to be one of the guardians for the heir who shortly afterward ascended the throne. Godounov then became de facto ruler of Russia. After Ivan's heir dies, Godounov was elected to the throne. Prior to all of this, Dmitri, the rightful heir to Ivan, died mysteriously. The plot assumes Dmitri was murdered by Boris, leading to Boris eventually becoming Tsar.

Spring is the time for all things new, and we’re going to be sampling some recent acquisitions on this week’s Dress Circle (4/21 7:00 p.m.).  These “new to us” recordings include studio cast recordings of two George and Ira Gershwin musicals from 1925 “Tip-Toes” and “Tell Me More.”  We’ll also be sampling songs from two television musicals, “Ruggles of Red Gap” by Jule Styne and Leo Robin and “Feathertop” by Mary Rodgers and Martin Charnin featuring performances by Michael Redgrave, Peter Lawford, and Jane Powell.  

On Fridays's Distant Mirror we'll complete the mass cycle of William Byrd as  the Tallis Scholars under Peter Phillips perform his Mass for 5 Voices, the last of his Latin masses from the early 1590's. Then, some great dance music from the 16th century with tunes from the collections of Tielman Susato, Pierre Phalese, Claude Gervase and Pierre Attaignant, all performed by the Clemencic Consort. Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

It’s another hour of Biblical epics, but with an interesting twist.  Rather than go directly to the Gospels, these are all films inspired by bestselling historical novels.  Tune in for music from film adaptations of Lloyd C. Douglas’ “The Robe” (Alfred Newman), Thomas B. Costain’s “The Silver Chalice” (Franz Waxman), Pär Lagerkvist’s “Barrabas” (Mario Nascimbene), and General Lew Wallace’s “Ben-Hur” (Miklós Rózsa).  It’s the New Testament made new, this Friday at 6 pm.

Joan Marcus


Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Brillhart

The world watched in despair at the images of flames roaring through Paris' Notre Dame Cathedral this past Monday, worrying about the fate of this historic, architectural - and to the French, national - treasure. As the shock and disbelief settled in, thoughts turned to the magnificent works of art inside, and for those in the music world, to the Grand Organ. Built in the 1860s by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll using some parts from two earlier organs, the organ has undergone several modifications and restorations and now features more than 8,000 pipes.

Steven Sametz, artistic director of The Princeton Singers, hosts this Sunday's Sounds Choral (4/21 at 2 pm), featuring music for the Easter season. The program will also include a preview of an upcoming concert by the Princeton Girlchoir called "Hear Me Roar!" highlighting music of women.

It’s a showcase of the work of Pavel Haas on this week’s Sunday Opera (4/21 3:00 p.m.) as we look at his only opera, written in 1936, “Sarlatan.”  Haas was one of the Czech-Jewish composers to be used by the Nazis as part of their propaganda display at Terezin (Theresienstadt concentration camp) for the Red Cross.  Haas was killed on October 17, 1944 at the age of 45 when he drew attention to himself, saving conductor Karel Ancerl when they were sent to Auschwitz immediately after the Red Cross’ visit.

On Thursday, 4-18 the Noon Concert called LENNY and tbe Boys from Cantus Novus chamber choir includes music by Sondheim, Bernstein, Hammerstein, Rheinberger and more. W. Edward McCall conducts.

Wednesday, 4-17 at noon on Curtis Calls we'll hear Mozart's Rondo, K 511, Six Piano Pieces by Johannes Brahms and two pieces by Henryk Wieniawski: Fantaisie Brillante on Themes from Gounod's Faust, op, 20 and Etude-caprice in D, op. 18, no. 3. Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute of Music, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evenings at 10.

Sunday evening (4-14) at 11 we'll hear the Clarinet Concerto by Einojuhani Rautavaara and the Sinfonietta by his student, Kimmo Hakola.  Also on the program is Fisher Tull's Symphonic Treatise. Music from the past half-century on Half Past.

At a time when most people’s knowledge of Handel’s large-scale vocal works began and ended with “Messiah,” Sir Thomas Beecham was dipping into the operas and polishing up the oratorios for the delectation of a new age.  He defended these curations and modifications, stating that “without some effort along these lines, the greater portion of [Handel’s] magnificent output will remain unplayed, possibly to the satisfaction of drowsy armchair purists....”  Experience the vitality of Beecham’s beautiful Handel realizations, this Sunday at 10 pm.

Schubert wanted success with opera. But the success eluded him, and often the operas did not make it on stage until far past his lifetime. This week's one act "The Four Year Post", waited until 1896, 68 years after his death, for its first staging.

The plot concerns Duval, who has deserted the army to remain with his wife Käthchen; when troops arrive to arrest him, he persuades the General – with the help of the villagers – that he has spent four years at his sentry post waiting for relief that never came, and he is released.

The Dress Circle this week (4/14 7:00 p.m.) will be heading off to Carnegie Hall for some concert performances, and there won’t be a single note of classical music.  In 1938, Benny Goodman took a chance and presented the first jazz concert at the hall, and it was successful.  The hall was filled, people danced and enjoyed the concert, and they didn’t tear the seats apart as was feared.  Since that time, there have been a variety of concerts, and we’ll be looking at a few of them.  

Hear both sacred and secular music by William Byrd on Friday's Distant Mirror. The Choir of Winchester Catheral under David Hill perform Byrd's Mass for 3 Voices. Then two consorts: The Leaves Be Gren, a praeludium and ground with Capriccio Stravagante directed by Skip Sempe. Join Allan Kelly at 10pm.

With Passover and Easter right around the corner, we’re entering the peak season for Bible movies.  This week on “Picture Perfect,” it’s an hour of music from epics inspired by the Old Testament – including “Samson and Delilah” (Victor Young), “Solomon and Sheba” (Mario Nascimbene), “Sodom and Gomorrah” (Miklós Rózsa), and “The Ten Commandments” (Elmer Bernstein).  Chariots!  Tunics!  Histrionic acting!  It’s going to be epic, this Friday at 6 pm.

Photo courtesy of Brigette Lacombe


IRIS Wired, The Classical Network's bi-monthly series of concerts by the IRIS Orchestra, this Friday (4/12 at 8 pm) features a program based on the theme of Springtime and Beauty. Founder, conductor and Artistic Director Michael Stern conducts the Hebrides Overture of Mendelssohn, Korngold's Violin Concerto with soloist Elena Urioste, Schubert's Unfinished Symphony and Schumann's Symphony No. 1 ("Spring").

Based in Germantown, Tenn., the IRIS Orchestra is made up of preeminent musicians from around the country and led by Maestro Stern, son of the legendary violinist.

Friday's (4-12) Noon Concert from Baruch Performing Arts Center includes Brian Mulligan singing Walden by Gregory Spears & Dominick Argento's From the Diary of Virginia Woolf.

Music in the Age of Tinoretto-Artist of Renaissance Venice is the title of the program we hear from Parthenia on Thursday's (4-11) Noon Concert. We'll hear music by Maschera, Tromboncino, Ruffo, Cara, Willaert, a half dozen or so other 16th to 17th century composers and Tomb Sonnets for countertenor & viol consort by contemporary composer Martin Kennedy.

A Tempo this week looks at how two upcoming performances reflect efforts to explore the impact of social, historic and economic trends on cities. Host Rachel Katz will speak with composer Derek Bermel and librettist Wendy S. Walters, whose Golden Motors is about the impact of the Detroit auto industry on those whose livelihoods depend on it. The New York debut of scenes from the work in progress will take place April 18 and 19 at Brooklyn’s BRIC House.

James Jordan, professor and senior conductor at Westminster Choir College, hosts Sounds Choral this Sunday (4/14 at 2 pm), presenting Howard Goodall's Invictus: A Passion.

A Basque opera?  We’ll have one on this week’s Sunday Opera (4/14 3:00 p.m.) as we turn to Jesus Guridi’s “Amaya.”  Guridi (1886 – 1961) played an important role as a Spanish / Basque composer who wrote operas and zarzuelas as well as orchestral, piano, choral, and organ works.  “Amaya” deals with several conflicts on which hangs the future of the Basque people in the 8th century.  Christianity is threatening the old religion, the Moors are invading Spain, and Amaya has to choose between the love of a Christian invader and that of a long-time Basque admirer.  She does, with tragic consequences.  

Wednesday 4-10 at noon on Curtis Calls we'll hear violinist Christine Lim and pianist Xiaohui Yang in Clara Schumann's Three Romances, op. 22, Robert Schumann's Sonata No. 1 and Beethoven's Sonata No. 7, op. 30, no. 2.  Performances from student recitals at the Curtis Institute, Wednesdays at noon and Monday evenings at 10.

Sunday evening, 4-7 at 11 on Half Past we present An Elizabethan Songbook by Eric Ewazen, the Viola Quintet (Unquiet Parables) by Carson Cooman and György Ligeti's Violin Concerto.  Music composed in the past half-century on Half Past.

The Lost Chord: April 7 - Myth Conceptions

Apr 7, 2019

Medusa.  The Sirens.  The Fates.  Pandora.  Female characters from classical mythology provide the inspiration for Stacy Garrop’s “Mythology Symphony.”  Likewise, archetypes from Homer inform Sarah Kirkland Snider’s post-genre song cycle “Penelope.”  Enduring myths of the ancient world are viewed from fresh perspectives, this Sunday at 10 pm.

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